9

Feb

by pi3

LKRG 0.1 was just released:

http://www.openwall.com/lkrg/

The change log is as follows:

I’m happy to announce that my moonlight project is finally released. Thanks to Alexander Peslyak (a.k.a. Solar Designer) it is available through Openwall.

Linux Kernel Runtime Guard (LKRG) is a loadable kernel module that performs runtime integrity checking of the Linux kernel and detection of security vulnerability exploits against the kernel. As controversial as this concept is, LKRG attempts to post-detect and hopefully promptly respond to unauthorized modifications to the running Linux kernel (integrity checking) or to credentials (such as user IDs) of the running processes (exploit detection). For process credentials, LKRG attempts to detect the exploit and take action before the kernel would grant the process access (such as open a file) based on the unauthorized credentials. You can download the current experimental version of LKRG at its brand new homepage:

18

Apr

by pi3

During Microsoft Patch Tuesday on April (2017) some of the Hyper-V vulnerabilities (found be me) were fixed:

Remote Code Execution – CVE-2017-0181 (details)
Denial of Service – CVE-2017-0182 (details)
Denial of Service – CVE-2017-0186 (details)

Hi,

The journey into CVE-2014-9322 is not straightforward but it is worth to spend some time on it and analyze all available information. I will try my best…

20

Feb

by pi3

As some of you know I am(was) active developer in ERESI project. ERESI stands for The ERESI Reverse Engineering Software Interface, its web page stands at: www.eresi-project.org.

eresi-logo

 

For those who do not know the project, The ERESI Reverse Engineering Software Interface is a multi-architecture binary analysis framework with a domain-specific language tailored to reverse engineering and program manipulation.

  • Feature both user-mode and kernel-mode support for instrumentation, debugging and program analysis
  • Handle INTEL and SPARC machine programs (partial support for ARM, MIPS and ALPHA processors).

I haven’t been posting on this blog for a while. It doesn’t mean I’m not doing research – I’m just not a big fan of releasing anything and most of my work stays private. Anyway because Apache released new version of their Http Server one of my research was burned. New version of Apache fixes remote code execution vulnerability in default instalation! This vulnerability is quite old and have been exploited in the wild for last 5 years 🙂

This vulnerability is fixed and no longer be 0day I decided to publish exploit code for this bug. How is it work? Find below:

29 of November 2011 was the date of public disclosure interesting vulnerability in lighttpd server. Xi Wang discovered that mod_auth for this server does not propely decode characters from the extended ASCII table. The vulnerable code is below:

"src/http_auth.c:67"
--- CUT ---
static const short base64_reverse_table[256] = ...;
static unsigned char * base64_decode(buffer *out, const char *in) {
    ...
    int ch, ...;
    size_t i;
    ...

        ch = in[i];
        ...
        ch = base64_reverse_table[ch];
    ...
}
--- CUT ---

Because variable ‘in’ is type ‘char’, characters above 0x80 lead to negative indices. This vulnerability may lead out-of-boud read and theoretically cause Segmentation Fault (Denial of Service attack). Unfortunately I couldn’t find any binaries where .rodata section before the base64_reverse_table table cause this situation.

Second level of GCHQ ‘canyoucrackit’ challenge requires to implement own Virtual Machine(!). This VM must emulate segmented memory model with 16-byte segment size (notation seg:offset). For details please read this link:

http://www.canyoucrackit.co.uk/15b436de1f9107f3778aad525e5d0b20.js

I wrote quick overview about this challenge, how to solve it and some tips. It can be found here:

Yesterday I read in one of the polish portal (with news) an  information about interesting challenge organized by the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). This is a British intelligence agency responsible for providing signals intelligence (SIGINT) and information assurance to the UK government and armed forces. Based in Cheltenham, it operates under the guidance of the Joint Intelligence Committee. CESG (originally Communications-Electronics Security Group) is the branch of GCHQ which works to secure the communications and information systems of the government and critical parts of UK national infrastructure.

Today I’ve received strange mail:

— CUT —
Date: Thu, 01 Sep 2011 09:11:00 +0200
From: gayroobaoll <gayroobaoll@o2.pl>
To: pi3@itsec.pl
Subject:

Chcesz, http://facebook.com/100002779484440

— CUT —

As we can see, there is no subject, mail include link to someone’s facebook profile and has got only one Polish world (yes, this is attack for the Polish ppl). “Chcesz” means “Do you want”. Strange, dosn’t it? Mail was send from the Polish portal (o2.pl) – free mails.

OK 😉 Let’s check this profile…