I’ve recently spent some time looking at ‘exec_id’ counter. Historically, Linux kernel had 2 independent security problems related to that code: CVE-2009-1337 and CVE-2012-0056.

Until 2012, ‘self_exec_id’ field (among others) was used to enforce permissions checking restrictions for /proc/pid/{mem/maps/…} interface. However, it was done poorly and a serious security problem was reported, known as “Mempodipper” (CVE-2012-0056). Since that patch, ‘self_exec_id’ is not tracked anymore, but kernel is looking at process’ VM during the time of the open().

In 2009 Oleg Nesterov discovered that Linux kernel has an incorrect logic to reset ->exit_signal. As a result, the malicious user can bypass it if it execs the setuid application before exiting (->exit_signal won’t be reset to SIGCHLD). CVE-2009-1337 was assigned to track this issue.

The logic responsible for handling ->exit_signal has been changed a few times and the current logic is locked down since Linux kernel 3.3.5. However, it is not fully robust and it’s still possible for the malicious user to bypass it. Basically, it’s possible to send arbitrary signals to a privileged (suidroot) parent process.

I’ve summarized my analysis and posted on LKML:
https://lists.openwall.net/linux-kernel/2020/03/24/1803

and kernel-hardening mailing list:
https://www.openwall.com/lists/kernel-hardening/2020/03/25/1

Btw. Kernels 2.0.39 and 2.0.40 look secure 😉

Thanks,
Adam

Comments

Leave a Reply




CAPTCHA * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.